renewable energy


John Droz Jr. has posted a couple of brilliant little videos on MasterResource highlighting some very pertinent questions about the efficacy of wind as a source of energy.

Part 1: Dick & Jane Talk Wind Power

I found the rejoinder “compared to what?” a very effective method of countering the green mumbo jumbo that is often spouted by wind supporters. Though well meaning, they seem completely oblivious to the fact that their simplistic arguments in favour of wind do not hold up to scrutiny. Nor do they recognize that they are mindlessly repeating the talking points of self-interested green promoters. In this, Big Wind is little different from Big Oil.

Part 2: Jane Speaks With Her Town Representative

In this video, I like the way Jane turns the tables on wind developers. It should not be up to the citizen to prove the shortcomings of a particular wind project, but for the developers to prove its benefits. Of course, in the absence of any objective scientific study on the costs and benefits of wind power, the wind industry is understandably loath to go down this path. But that should not stop citizens from demanding it.

Advertisements

I’d put my money on the “self-appointed guru“.

Parker Gallant writes some of the most lucid commentary on Ontario energy policy. On the other hand, Brad Duguid has had extensive experience with energy issues since, well, his appointment as Minister of Energy earlier this year.

asks Christina Blizzard.

The wisest plan is to push ahead with a big honkin’ nuclear plant. They don’t spew fumes. But good luck convincing the eco warriors that nukes are green.

Now gas-fired plants are on the do-not-build list.

That leaves us with windmills, solar and a couple of hamsters running around on a treadmill to keep the lights on.

Is it any wonder, electricity prices are going up?

It was only a matter of time:

Japan files trade dispute over Ontario solar power rates

 

GENEVA — Japan has initiated a trade dispute against Canada related to renewable energy equipment in the province of Ontario, the World Trade Organization confirmed on Monday.

The Japanese mission to the WTO said the dispute centres on guaranteed long-term pricing for solar and wind generators made with a certain percentage of locally-produced components.

Some industrial strategy.

Long held up as the green-energy model by environmentalists, Denmark has announced it will be abandoning the development of onshore wind farms in the future.

“I think there’s an outbreak of realism,” says Constable. “Wind is not a bad technology. It’s just a lot more limited than people thought in the past.” Denmark, of course, was also the place where UN efforts to reach an overarching climate deal collapsed in acrimony last year. The country appears to be developing a habit of puncturing greens’ wilder hopes.

 Marc Gunther notes the obvious in the September issue of Wired:

Wind farms rely on big tax breaks to be competitive, and right now that money is being wasted. When more people catch wind of that fact, this promising form of alt energy could be labeled a boondoggle for farm states, as corn ethanol has been.

All too true. Yet his proposed solution comes right out of Dalton McGuinty’s playbook:

To make wind power work, then, the government needs to do more than just subsidize turbines. We need to give the federal government more power to overrule local objections and buy rights of way to get high-capacity transmission lines built across several states—say, from the Dakotas to the big cities of the Midwest. That’s how the interstate highway system and natural gas pipelines got built.

Scary.

Canada Free Press has an informative article on wind capacity. It concludes:

The term “Generating Capacity” as used by the wind power proponents is grossly misleading as it would require steady, uninterrupted storm to hurricane force winds to be achieved on a sustained basis.

The variability of wind creates technical problems which make wind power generated electricity both unreliable and costly.

Electricity generation from wind requires full backup by conventional power generating facilities. That creates additional costs attributable to wind power.

Wind power generated electricity is neither free, nor economical, nor a reliable energy source.

Next Page »